AL DíA: Publishing Students’ Research

Thanks to a blog entry on STEMmom’s blog, I found out about several websites (online research journals) that publish high school students’ research.

Here is a short list of journals that accept middle and/or high school students’ research efforts:

  • The Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to enhancing scientific literacy in middle and high school students. The mission of JEI is to teach students how to think clearly and creatively, training them to navigate scientific literature, and write about their experiments in context of their respective scientific fields.
  • Journal of Experimental Secondary Science (JESS) is a professionally reviewed academic journal which exclusively publishes original research articles written by high school students. Submissions are reviewed by college professors and research scientists, who are chosen based on their expertise in the area of science that each article addresses. 
  • STEM Fellowship is a Canadian Science Publishing client journal and is the only such journal that is dedicated to high school and undergraduate students. Our open-access feature guarantees maximum accessibility given that you don’t have to be in a subscribing university to see what we publish. 

via STEM Mom

Another thought…We Need More STEM Majors with Liberal Arts Training

A scientist trained in the liberal arts has another huge advantage: writing ability. The study of writing and analyses of texts equip science students to communicate their findings as professionals in the field. . .Scientists are often unable to communicate effectively because, as Cornell University president David J. Skorton points out, “many of us never received the education in the humanities or social sciences that would allow us to explain to nonscientists what we do and why it is important.”


Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

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