Category Archives: DigitalStorytelling

3 Steps to Leverage Technology for Language Learners

Image Source: http://goo.gl/yE4tUD


Technology can change the way students communicate in the classroom. It can create new patterns of discourse. 

Looking for some ways to leverage technology to enhance dual language instruction? While the first impulse may be to buy content that has technology components, often materials aren’t readily available for purchase. District and campus staff can leverage technology to enhance dual language instruction by using it to create content, facilitate communication between classes, and, then, facilitate sharing.

Some ways to leverage technology include the following:
  1. Students and teachers can use digital devices as tools for authentic communication and for accomplishing intellectually challenging, nonremedial tasks in the context of culturally appropriate whole activities. 
  2. Students can use technology to produce theme-centered, multimedia slide shows, electronic hypermedia books, and publish their poetry and written pieces. 
  3. Students can use technology to graph real life data and explore–with audio recordings–the relationships between data and their graphical representations.
  4. Students begin to learn the words for the graphics they wish to incorporate in their slide show, as well as the processes of modifying, saving and retrieving their work. Students learn to interweave audio narration using the microphone on their digital device, with some experimenting in the target language by reading or translating their work


Here are 3 easy steps you can follow in any classroom, but especially, a language learning class:

Step 1 – Create Content:

The tools for creating content have never been easier to use. Consider the following:
  • Narrated Audio Slideshows  – (read more)
  • Create eBooks – Students can create ebooks that incorporate audio, video, and text. (read more)
    • On iPad/Android tablets, use Book Creator app ($4.99)
    • On Chromebook and/or laptops/desktop computers, create ebook with GoogleDocs and/or LibreOffice, respectively.
  • Digital Storytelling – Students can approach storytelling from two perspectives – oral composition or written composition. Remember digital storytelling approach can be used for any content area, not just text. And students reading peers’ context while listening to audio is powerful and supported in the research.
    • Oral Storytelling – Focus is on audio recording. Take pictures and then add audio narration. Or, simply record audio of a child’s story, then have them prepare text to match it.
    • Written Composition Approach – Students write a script, match pictures to main events in the script, then narrate it, combining all the components into a narrated slideshow.
    Step 2 – Publish Content
    If your district doesn’t have an its own online space where staff and students can publish video, audio and images, you can take advantage of GoogleApps for Education with its unlimited storage to house content and/or YouTube. There really isn’t any reason why you can’t share content with a global audience!

    Step 3 – Share, Share, Share
    Once content is shared online, consider creating a district clearinghouse for awesome content in a GoogleSite (web site). This can be organized by grade level, reading level, etc.

    Conclusion
    The main benefit of these 3 steps is that it removes the some of the pressure of finding dual language materials, and instead helps students and staff create content that is relevant, appropriate, and engaging, while building on students’ key learning experiences. 


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    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

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    Vidcast: Amy Stengel on Digital Storytelling @amyroleto @diben #writing #txeduchat

     
    View Vidcast of Amy Stengel’s Webinar Presentation
    on Digital Storytelling

    Amy Stengel

    Amy Stengel serves as the Director of Creative Writing at the NorthEast School of the Arts (NESA) English program at Lee High School in the NorthEast Independent School District. Her work as a teacher has inspired countless teens to pursue their love of writing and engage in a multitude of projects.


    Amy’s work with the San Antonio Area Council of Teachers of English (SAACTE.org) is also worthy of mention. You can find out more about SAACTE andread Amy’s welcome message online.

    Twitter: @amyroleto
    Facebook: Amy Stengel



    SHOW LINKS:
    1. http://animoto.com
    2. Flickr Photo from Mobile Only – https://secure.flickr.com/groups/73532194@N00/
    3. Animoto Education – http://animoto.com/pro/education
    4. Animoto for iPad – https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/animoto-video-slideshows/id459248037?ls=1&mt=8
    5. Podsafe Music –  http://www.last.fm/music/+free-music-downloads/classical
    6. compfight.com
    7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podsafe
    8. The GIMP – http://www.gimp.org/
    9. Safe Place to Share Stories – http://storybird.com/
    10. Google Search Stories – http://www.youtube.com/user/SearchStories
    11. Video from Amy’s Presentation on Creative Writing Tea Time
    12. Huffington Post on Digital Storytelling – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tag/digital-storytelling

    About This Free Webinar Series Open to All Educators

    Welcome to the Weekly Webinar Series onDigitizing the Writing Workshop. The co-hosts for Weekly Webinar Series onDigitizing the Writing Workshop include Diana Benner (Del Valle ISD, Tx) and Miguel Guhlin (East Central ISD, Tx). Find out more–such as the schedule for webinars, recordings and future guests–about the series online athttp://tinyurl.com/etchweb  or Twitter Hashtag: #etchweb

    Note: You can earn credit for participating–along with a certificate–for this series if you are a Del Valle ISD or East Central ISD teacher. Watch the vidcast linked below for more information.


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    Telling Social Stories with the #iPad #autism @humbledaisy

    Earlier today, I found myself preparing a session presentation for a local conference entitled, Transforming Social Storytelling with the iPad.  Wholly ignorant of this approach, I’ve been delighted to find out that telling social stories can have a profound impact on individuals who fall within the “autism spectrum.”

    Here’s the TechFiesta session description:

    “Social Stories were devised as a tool to help individuals on the autism spectrum better understand the nuances of interpersonal communication so that they could interact in an effective and appropriate manner” (Source: Wikipedia). 

    Blend images and sound into a video social story using your iPad. Learn how you can use inexpensive apps on the iPad to easily create social stories for those within the autism spectrum.

    Have you heard of “social stories?” I certainly had not. A work colleague had prepared several fascinating narrated slideshows or enhanced podcasts and shared them with me. Unfortunately, while I could offer technical suggestion, I didn’t quite understand what s/he was trying to accomplish aside from narrating photos she had taken and sharing the resulting video with the student and his/her parents.

    Social Stories are simple, quick, personalized little stories that put a particular kid as the “star” of the story- and help that child gain understanding about the social world around him- both what to expect, and what is expected of him.  

    Social Stories are commonly used in the autism/Aspergers/PDD community, but I think they are helpful for all kids. When my own children were small and had not yet acquired language, I used Social Stories to help them understand day to day routine. (Source: Skills for Living)


    When I asked for clarification, I was told that they are social stories. I immediately googled this term and stumbled upon Carol Gray’s web site on the subject. There, social stories are described in this way:

    Click here to view a You Tube video of Carol Gray describing Social Stories(TM).A Social Story™ describes a situation, skill, or concept in terms of relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses in a specifically defined style and format. 

    The goal of a Social Story™ is to share accurate social information in a patient and reassuring manner that is easily understood by its audience. Half of all Social Stories™ developed should affirm something that an individual does well. 

    Although the goal of a Story™ should never be to change the individual’s behavior, that individual’s improved understanding of events and expectations may lead to more effective responses.
    Click here for more detailed information.

    For iPad users, there are immediate applications. One of the applications being used is the versatile Sonic Pics ($2.99). You can blend Sonic Pics creation into a video using iMovie or, my favorite, Pinnacle Studio on the iPad. 

    A few other creation tools include the following:

    Other apps also work:

    Some social story video samples:


    Of course, you don’t just have to use an iPad to accomplish this, but the iPad does make doing this quite easy. The videos that have been shared with me have a simple script–prepared by an educational diagnostician–that read like the one below:

    John likes the red sliding board on the big playground. 

    Jennifer likes the red sliding board too. 

    Mark walked to the top of the slide and sitting on his bottom. He is going to slide down.  

    Ms. Gonzales and John are sitting at the top of the yellow sliding board. John slid all the way to the bottom, very slowly. 

    Jennifer slid down quickly!  

    John is walking up the steps to get on a sliding board. 

    These friends like to hang from the green bars. These friends say sliding down the blue sliding board is fun! All 3 friends slid down.  

    “Recess is over! Time to Go!” 

    John is going to line up with his friends.

    You can imagine the photos/images that go with each paragraph or line above. Each illustrates the line featuring a student’s actions, whether by him/herself or with others. A piece of advice that describes these social stories:

    As much as possible include actual photos of the child in the social story. I have found its much more effective and intriguing to the child to read a social story that has pictures of their family, home, school, and own face inside of it. (Source: I Love ABA!)

    Here is another example:

    The following is an example of a social story explaining when it’s appropriate to
    run:
     


    Running
    I like to run.  It is fun to go fast.
    It’s okay to run when I am playing outside.
    I can run when I am on the playground.
    Sometimes I feel like running, but it is dangerous to run when I am inside.
    Running inside could hurt me or other people.
    When people are inside, they walk.
    Walking inside is safe.
    I will try to walk inside and only run when I am outside on the playground.
    My teachers and parents like it when I remember to walk inside. 


    Combining images featuring a child and the narration results in, what it looks like to me is, Carol Gray’s storymovies

    However, in the edtech world, this is enhanced podcasting or, as Wes Fryer calls them, narrated slideshows. A simplified version of a digital story featuring a script and words. There are many tools that could be used to accomplish the creation of social stories…it is the use to which the tools are put to create a social story that is novel and exciting!

    Some of the suggestions for writing a social story are as follows and are available online from The National Autistic Society (UK) article, How to Write a Social Story:

    • social stories need to have an introduction, body and conclusion and should use positive language (ie where possible, describe what should happen, rather than what should not)
    • stories need to be as accurate as possible and should include words like sometimes and usually for situations where a particular outcome is not guaranteed
    • stories should appeal to the interests of the person for whom they are written. Avoid using words that may cause the person anxiety or distress
    • the content and presentation of social stories should be appropriate to the person’s age and level of understanding.
    • If writing for a child, write from the first person perspective (I will try to wait until it is daytime before I get up in the morning).
    • Pair age-appropriate photographs, picture symbols or drawings with text to help people who have difficulty reading or for younger children, as in Figure 2 at the bottom of this page. 
    • When writing for young people or adults, use the third person perspective (they, he, she) and adjust language and presentation accordingly. You could use a smaller font size, or present the story in columns as in a newspaper article.

    Have you created a social story with an iPad?

    Want to read more about social stories? Check out this Evernote Notebook on the subject or just Google it. Tons of information out there.




    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

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    >Celebrate Texas Voices

    >

    Share your stories on Celebrate Texas Voices (CTV)…about the site:

    CTV is a statewide digital storytelling project empowering learners to become digital witnesses, archiving local oral history and sharing that history safely on the global stage of the Internet. Our project is based on the successfulCelebrate Oklahoma Voices project which started in 2006.

    The site includes links to the following great resources that can get you started with Digital Storytelling:

    1. Workshop Resources
    2. Workshop Agenda (PDF)
    3. iMovie QuickStart Guide
    4. Image Resources
    5. Music and Audio Resources
    6. Copyright and Fair Use Resources

    Kudos to Wes Fryer (Moving at the Speed of Creativity) and others for getting this going! Now, all that’s needed is for Texans to get going!


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    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

    3 Presentations/Videos

    Interesting presentations/videos…thanks to Free Tech For Teachers Blog for highlighting them. The beauty of an RSS feed juxtaposes all these together.

    32 Technology Integration Tips (via Free Tech for Teachers Blog)

    http://docs.google.com/present/embed?id=df6bwk2v_285f2jc8vc6

    Digital Storytelling from Curriki:

    http://www.youtube.com/v/zP6CeGLPuOY&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xcfcfcf&feature=player_embedded&fs=1

    http://www.youtube.com/v/zP6CeGLPuOY

    A Guide to Annotating Using Diigo by Jose Picardo
    (via Free Tech for Teachers)

    http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=6706341&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

    A Guide to Annotating using Diigo from José Picardo on Vimeo.

    http://vimeo.com/6706341

    Note: It’s in Vimeo…if you don’t have access to the Vimeo web site or YouTube because it’s blocked, consider using http://clipnabber.com to download the video as an mp4. Works well! I used it to download PBWorks Video Tutorials!


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    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

    Digital Storytelling Festival – ShowBeyond.com Experiment

    Thanks to Larry Ferlazzo, I just became aware of this nifty new tool, Show Beyond.com. It’s a great tool for creating enhanced podcasts or digital stories, or narrated slideshows!

    Still need a little work on getting the audio to work perfectly but…no big deal!

    http://www.showbeyond.com/tools/players.swf


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    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

    Digital Storytelling Toolkit

    Check out the Digital Storytelling ToolKit


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    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure