Category Archives: Education

3 Steps to Leverage Technology for Language Learners

Image Source: http://goo.gl/yE4tUD


Technology can change the way students communicate in the classroom. It can create new patterns of discourse. 

Looking for some ways to leverage technology to enhance dual language instruction? While the first impulse may be to buy content that has technology components, often materials aren’t readily available for purchase. District and campus staff can leverage technology to enhance dual language instruction by using it to create content, facilitate communication between classes, and, then, facilitate sharing.

Some ways to leverage technology include the following:
  1. Students and teachers can use digital devices as tools for authentic communication and for accomplishing intellectually challenging, nonremedial tasks in the context of culturally appropriate whole activities. 
  2. Students can use technology to produce theme-centered, multimedia slide shows, electronic hypermedia books, and publish their poetry and written pieces. 
  3. Students can use technology to graph real life data and explore–with audio recordings–the relationships between data and their graphical representations.
  4. Students begin to learn the words for the graphics they wish to incorporate in their slide show, as well as the processes of modifying, saving and retrieving their work. Students learn to interweave audio narration using the microphone on their digital device, with some experimenting in the target language by reading or translating their work


Here are 3 easy steps you can follow in any classroom, but especially, a language learning class:

Step 1 – Create Content:

The tools for creating content have never been easier to use. Consider the following:
  • Narrated Audio Slideshows  – (read more)
  • Create eBooks – Students can create ebooks that incorporate audio, video, and text. (read more)
    • On iPad/Android tablets, use Book Creator app ($4.99)
    • On Chromebook and/or laptops/desktop computers, create ebook with GoogleDocs and/or LibreOffice, respectively.
  • Digital Storytelling – Students can approach storytelling from two perspectives – oral composition or written composition. Remember digital storytelling approach can be used for any content area, not just text. And students reading peers’ context while listening to audio is powerful and supported in the research.
    • Oral Storytelling – Focus is on audio recording. Take pictures and then add audio narration. Or, simply record audio of a child’s story, then have them prepare text to match it.
    • Written Composition Approach – Students write a script, match pictures to main events in the script, then narrate it, combining all the components into a narrated slideshow.
    Step 2 – Publish Content
    If your district doesn’t have an its own online space where staff and students can publish video, audio and images, you can take advantage of GoogleApps for Education with its unlimited storage to house content and/or YouTube. There really isn’t any reason why you can’t share content with a global audience!

    Step 3 – Share, Share, Share
    Once content is shared online, consider creating a district clearinghouse for awesome content in a GoogleSite (web site). This can be organized by grade level, reading level, etc.

    Conclusion
    The main benefit of these 3 steps is that it removes the some of the pressure of finding dual language materials, and instead helps students and staff create content that is relevant, appropriate, and engaging, while building on students’ key learning experiences. 


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    When You Fall Out of "the Box"

    What’s it take for you to think “out of the box?” For me, it’s the juxtaposition of two ideas (or activities) that force me to compare something I hadn’t previously considered. It happened to me yesterday and I keep having that “V8 moment” when you slap your hand to your forehead and say, Why didn’t I think of this sooner? 

    Image Source: http://goo.gl/vEa5Oy

    While I often think of screencasting to showcase how to use technology in instructional settings, I found myself stepping over the imaginary boundaries of screencast usage yesterday. I know, it wasn’t that big of a step but mentally, it was. That bothered me because I should have thought of how to use screencasting to showcase for Transportation staff how to accomplish a simple thing–using GreenShot snapshot program on Windows to capture a screen then print it.

    Here’s my write-up on the situation, which featured two people involved. I suppose what was pretty “duh!” for me was, “Why didn’t I think of using Screencastify to do this for non-instructional staff earlier?”

    With that in mind, a new question I’m asking myself is, “How can you use screencasting in situations other than what you’ve typically used it for?”

    And, in fact, how can I use technology in my role as a tech director in ways I haven’t imagined before? For me, that’s “out of the box” thinking.

    1. Find two disparate ideas or ways of doing cognitively different tasks and then put them next to each other. What does one way of doing things teach you about accomplishing the other?
    2. While working on one task, switch to another. Is there a way you can do the new, unrelated task similar to the way you did the first?
    3. Be open to possibilities via your professional learning network (PLN). How are they doing things that you can push yourself to try?

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    Job Posting: Systems Interface Specialist

    Note: The East Central ISD has shared the following job announcement for a Systems Interface Specialist. Read more below and apply online at http://www.ecisd.net

    EAST CENTRAL INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT
    Job Announcement – December 2, 2014

    Systems Interface Specialist

    The position for Systems Interface Specialist will be available in the East Central Independent School District for the 2014-2015 school year. Employees of the District may apply in writing to the Personnel Office. Others who are interested in this position may apply online at www.ecisd.net and then contact the Personnel Office at 210-648-7861 to express interest. The position will remain posted until it is filled.

    Primary Purpose: The Systems Interface Specialist will be responsible for working with a variety of technology systems, specializing in database interfaces between student or business information systems and third party vendors.

    DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

    1. Support the interface of cloud based hosted applications, single sign-on technologies, and curriculum and software vendors systems.
    2. Support Student Information System (e.g. iTCCS) and data management systems, including the ECISD mirror copy of ITCCS data.
    3. Actively learn and apply knowledge of SQL, MySQL, VBScript, Windows Batch Scripting, etc.
    4. Create and maintain project plans that identify expectations, deliverables, tasks, milestone dates, status, and resource
      allocation.
    5. Apply appropriate project management techniques to minimize risk and ensure the success of all projects.
    6. Establish and maintain regular written and in-person communication.
    7. Develop and maintain technical documentation related to assigned functions and responsibilities.
    8. Ensure that an exceptional level of customer service is provided.
    9. Complete post-project evaluations to determine how results were achieved.
    10. Understand and apply client/server applications architecture and management.
    11. Understand and offer input on growing the District’s network and server architecture.
    12. Display strong communication and organizational skills.
    13. Facilitate complex, cross-functional projects to successful completion with multiple departments and vendor partners.
    14. Produce high quality work in a dynamic environment.
    15. Exhibit efficient communication to stakeholders with excellent written and verbal communication skills.
    16. Display the ability to work under pressure and remain calm in the midst of changing circumstances.
    17. Exhibit the ability to rapidly adapt and respond to changes in the environment and priorities.

    Note: Not all applicants will be interviewed. Each applicant’s resume, application, and other available information will be considered in the screening process. Only those persons currently meeting all of the minimum requirements will be screened.

    MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
    1. Bachelor’s degree (preferred)
    2. Experience developing, implementing, and refining systems, processes, and/or protocols
    3. Ability to identify an issue, structure and implement a problem-solving approach
    4. Ability to engage and inspire a wide range of audiences
    5. Experience developing Gantt charts and using other common project management techniques/tools


    EQUIPMENT USED: Computer, printer, digital cameras, video equipment, scanners, service tools, software programs

    WORKING CONDITIONS: Mental Demands/Physical Demands/Environmental Factors: Maintain emotional control under stress and work with frequent interruptions. Frequent standing, stooping, bending, kneeling, pushing, and pulling. Repetitive hand motions, frequent keyboarding and use of mouse; occasional reaching. Occasional light lifting and carrying (less than 45 pounds). Frequent districtwide travel.

    PERIOD OF EMPLOYMENT: 226 days SALARY: Based on experience

    Roland Toscano – Superintendent of Schools


    *An Equal Opportunity Employer*


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    MyNotes: 5 Social Media Tips for School District Communications

    “Social media gives us tremendous power, but not everyone chooses to use that power for good.” 

    Source: ln.is/buff.ly/zN3GC via @deannamascle

    A few years ago, I wrote an article, Reaching for the Heart: 5 Tips for School District Communications, which focused on the use social media. At the end of this blog entry, I re-share the 5 Tips again for schools.

    In that article, I share the following:

    …time and again, school districts step back from encouraging their staff, students and parents from using social media. Failure to embrace these tools leaves school districts open to attacks, but times are changing–parents are fighting back using social media. “Activist parents now have,” points out Dr. Scott McLeod, “a bevy of new tools and strategies to help facilitate their agendas and they are not afraid to use them. School organizations are going to have to get used to this new state of affairs in which parent activism and criticism are more public, permanent, and far-reaching.”

    Earlier today, I had the opportunity to listen to an engaging presentation by Suzanne Marchman, Director of Communications & Media Relations, TASAnet.org on Media Relations: Tips & Techniques for Working with the Media. 

    In this blog entry, you’ll find some of my take-aways–and any errors are mine–from her presentation:

    Understanding Today’s Media Environment
    1. Pressure on today’s reporter
    2. Slow death of traditional media
    3. On deadline, all the time
    4. Information Overload
    5. Impact of social media
    6. Rise of video, reader comments
    7. News is often adverse, negative, tense, dramatic
    8. Media are extremely competitive (it’s about ratings & readership)
    9. When you know ratings is what is motivating a reporter…it changes the way he views…how can I get you to watch? What is their angle?
    10. Keep those things in the back of your mind. NOT all reporters are bad or out to get the dirt.
    11. What is “news?”
    12. What makes the news?
    13. How can you make the news?
    1. Leander ISD Bus Driver Video
    2. View Leander ISD bus driver video
    3. Avoid no-win interviews
    4. The District provided a written statement, as well as the relevant Penal Code. Provide the reporter with filler.
    5. In that particular situation, a letter was sent home with students.
  • New Rules of Social Media
    1. Everything you say or do can be broadcast faster, wider, in shorter form, and without context:
    2. Twitter
    3. Facebook
    4. YouTube
    5. Blogs
    6. Any of those can become a firing squad.
  • Reporters use social media:
    1. Find sources
    2. Search for story ideas
    3. Create buzz about a story they’re covering
    4. Provide real-time coverage of events
    5. Consider social media fair game for quotes without permission
    6. Print reporters will find negative perspectives
  • It’s Not Just Reporters Using Social Media
    1. Kyron Birdine, a junior at Arlington High School, was suspended after tweeting a photo of his STAAR test.
    2. View news story
    3. Kneejerk reaction from TEA and school district. All of this hits the media
  • It’s Not Just Reporters Using Social Media
    1. Jonathan Stickland: “I am a bit extra heated tonight. I just wrote a $2600 check to the state of Texas for my property taxes that will go to pay for a educational system that sucks and my family will never use. It is bull***t and its unfair (August 25, 2011 at 11:05pm)
    2. Ginger Russell, Red Hot Conservative blogger (http://www.redhotconservative.com/)
  • When You Get the Call
    1. …and you don’t know what to say, buy yourself some time.
    2. Ask the reporter if they would be willing to email you their questions.
    3. Find out the reporter’s deadline. If you know you can’t meet it, say so.
    4. Tell them you are working on a deadline. “If you gotta a minute, could you email me your questions?”
    5. For TV reporters, deadline is 5:00pm.
    6. Let the reporter know when you expect to have an answer. Don’t let their be a big gap in the time from reporter’s first contact to present. This will help build a relationship that will get them to have your back and they will avoid “throwing your district under the bus.”
    7. Gather your facts.
    8. Brainstorm potential questions that may be asked and prepare your responses.
    9. Why should she care about your story?
    10. What questions might be asked?
    11. What follow-up questions might be prompted by your answers?
    12. WHat’s the purpose of the interview? What’s the story?
  • The Interview
    1. Find out the nature of the interview.
    2. Ask for the reporter’s deadline.
    3. Let the reporter know when you can be available.
    4. Give yourself time to prepare, even if it’s just 5 minutes.
    5. Be in control of the interview.
  • Your message
    1. Before you begin the interview, gather all your facts.
    2. Decide the 3 most important things you want to say and then write them down.
    3. Brainstorm potential questions that may be asked and prepare some type of response.
    4. Relax.
    5. Respond with confidence.
    6. Be aware of your body language.
      1. Be careful of perceptions
    7. Look at the reporter when answering questions.
    8. Avoid saying “No comment”
    9. Using stall tactics can also result in “No Comment”
      1. “Superintendent Jones was unavailable for comment yesterday, despite repeated attempts.”
    10. Stick to the facts.
    11. Answer the questions as succinctly as possible. Stop talking when you have answered the question.
    12. Avoid the jargon…or at least be prepared to explain. (e.g. AYP, AEIS, PEIMS, ADA, ARD)
    13. If a reporter repeats a question, repeat your original answer.
    14. Avoid guessing, speculating or answering “what if” or hypothetical questions.
    15. Nothing is ever “off the record.”
  • Bridging Your Message – AVOID THIS TECHNIQUE
    1. “Bridging” is a technique to avoid answering a question and redirect the reporter back to your key message. Bridging is often a crutch for politicians.
      1. “What important to remember…”
      2. That’s certainly a concern, but the real issue is…”
      3. “Let’s not forget…”
      4. “Before I answer that…”
      5. Let me put that in perspective…”
      6. Let’s start at the beginning…”
  • Tips for TV & Radio Interviews – Questions to Ask Beforehand:
    1. Is it live or pre-recorded?
    2. How long is it going to be? When is it broadcast?
    3. What’s the format? One on one interview, debate, questions from callers?
    4. What is the purpose?
    5. Who else is involved?
    6. Who is the interviewer/host?
  • On-Camera Interview
    1. Before the camera begins to roll, ask what to expect.
    2. Relax. Use positive body language and a friendly greeting.
    3. Look at and talk to the reporter (not the camera) when answering questions.
    4. Keep an open face and smile when appropriate.
    5. State the most important information first.
    6. Keep your answers brief. Make only one point per sentence.
    7. Avoid distracting mannerisms (like jingling pocket change, tapping fingers, rocking in a chair).
    8. Answer the question, then stop talking. The reporter is not going to broadcast “dead air”
    9. Repeat, repeat, repeat your most important message.
    10. If it’s taped, ask to start over if you stumble
    11. If you don’t know something, say so.
    12. Not responding at all on camera to a question can hurt your credibility. Dead air is okay, but only if you have given some type of answer.
    13. “I don’t have that information here, but I’m happy to get it for you and send it to you later today or when we’re done.”
    14. Nothing is ever “off the record.” No matter how nice or friendly a reporter is, or how many times they say “this is off the record,” everything you say has the potential to end up in the news–either in print or on air. Be aware of your comments after the interview.
  • So, as promised, please find my 5 tips below for schools:
    Here are 5 tips for K-12 educators, communication professionals or not, inspired by Social Media Explorer similar blog entry:

    1. Craft A True Story Worth Sharing: Content that hasn’t been prefabricated, is lifeless and written in third person, but is authentic, transparent, open about success as well as failure will be read by your constituents. Start with a story, including audio, video, avoiding being limited by one format or another (e.g. text, video, audio). What a great way for students, community members and staff to find out what is going on from others in their organization. 
    2. Make Content Sharing Easy: Press releases on a web site just do not work anymore. Traditional web sites that can’t be subscribed to using RSS feeds or that allow email subscription are dead sites. Use social media workflows that allow you to post content once in a blog then it is autoshared via social media outlets like Twitter, Google+, Facebook, Instagram, etc. 
    3. Create a Content Calendar: In your District, there are many wonderful things happening that your community wants to know about. Create a content calendar that enables you to map out with a calendar what you will be sharing with others online.
    4. Define and Build Relationships: While it may not be popular to follow your local news reporters via Twitter, it is critical that you do so. It is critical because you can raise their awareness by the engaging content that you are sharing about your school district. While they may want to focus on the negative, you can mitigate the effect of their tweets by building a relationship of trust and integrity through the stories you share about your district, your campus, and your classroom.
    5. Make Offline Available Online: Every speaking engagement, each meeting is an opportunity to share your ideas. Avoid the mistake of creating content solely for online or offline audiences. When you create offline content–a conversation with parents at the morning coffee meet-n-mingle with the principal–take the time to write about it, maybe even debrief a parent in a one on one conversation. “What did you think about our morning coffee meeting? How did it impact you?” Take the time to share what you’re doing online.

    These 5 tips combined with Ms. Marchman’s advice will serve you well.

    Remember: With great power comes great responsibility. Social media gives us tremendous power, but not everyone chooses to use that power for good. Are you following, inquiring, engaging, and feeding others through your social media accounts? Being a connected educator means that you are making connections and help others do so as well. (Source: Connected=Community, by @deannamascle)


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    Going 1 to 1 with…Something

    After reading this Gartner report summary…

    “IT leaders can spend half a million dollars to buy and support 1,000 enterprise-owned tablets, while they can support 2,745 user-owned tablets with that same budget,” said Federica Troni, research director at Gartner. “Without a stipend, direct costs of user-owned tablets are 64 per cent lower. When organizations have several users who want a tablet as a device of convenience, offering a BYOD option is the best alternative to limit cost and broaden access.” Source: CBROnline

    …a question popped into my mind. The question is, what’s the cost of going 1 to 1 in a local district given these numbers:

    • Staff: 1,233
    • Students: 9,820, which breaks out in this way:
    • PreK-3: 3,038
    • Grades 4-5: 1,457
    • Grades 6-8: 2,293
    • Grades 9-12: 3,032

    Some “givens” we can work from:

    • 100% wireless access everywhere in schools, so no infrastructure to go build up.
    • Staff and students can bring their own devices (e.g. tablets, smartphones, computers)
    1) Dell Chromebook 11 inch with management –  $314.46 per unit
    • $387,729.18 worth of Chromebooks for 1,233 staff (this is everyone, including custodians, maintenance, paraprofessionals and auxiliary staff, not just teachers and admins).
    • $3,087,997.20 worth of Chromebooks for 9,820 students (this is PreK-12 students). That breaks down in this way:
    • $955,329.50 for 3,038 PreK-3 students
    • $458,168.20 for 1,457 grade 4-5 students
    • $721,056.80 for 2,293 grade 6-8 students
    • $953,442.70 for 3,032 grade 9-12 students
    Main Benefits:
    • Keyboard and trackpad
    • Full support for GoogleApps for Education, including email, calendaring, unlimited online storage, productivity tools like word processing, spreadsheet, drawing, presentations, GoogleVault email archiving.
    • IStation support by January, 2015
    • Think Through Math support available
    • Minimal management, no antivirus/malware solutions needed
    Suggestion(s): To off-set lack of quality image/video capture, buy an iPad Mini per classroom.
    2) iPad Mini with Case with management via JAMF’s CasperSuite – $307
    • $369,900 worth of iPad Minis for 1,233 staff (this is everyone, including custodians, maintenance, paraprofessionals and auxiliary staff, not just teachers and admins).
    • $2,946,000 worth of iPad Minis for 9,820 students (this is PreK-12 students). That breaks down in this way:
    • $911,400 for 3,038 PreK-3 students
    • $437,100 for 1,457 grade 4-5 students
    • $687,900 for 2,293 grade 6-8 students
    • $909,600 for 3,032 grade 9-12 students
    Main Benefits:
    • There are several possibilities depending on your iPad app selections. Most of advantages include easy video/image capture, document camera, etc.
    3) Hybrid Mix

    Some combo of these two devices and desktops.

    Ok, I ran out of gas on this blog entry.
    🙂


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    CTOsRole: District Technology Report Card

    After reviewing this excellent post by Lisa Nielsen, Considerations for EdTech Purchases, I felt inspired to take a stab at a “technology report card.” Unfortunately, it is but a quick stab that doesn’t mention libraries, voice over IP (VOIP), etc. In fact, it is quite deficient.

    Still, it does serve as a list to score technology efforts and identify areas that need to be included…have fun ripping it apart!

    You can actually edit the GoogleDoc if you prefer.

    District Technology Planning
    Report Card


    Infrastructure


    Key Element
    Ideal
    Score
    (0=No, 1=Yes)
    Electrical wiring
    Ample electricity enables almost unlimited # of devices to be connected.
    Wireless access
    40-60 devices can connect per classroom and meeting area with WPA2 Enterprise or better for network+internet, while guests can connect with any device.
    Wired access
    6 network drops in every classroom
    Easy WiFi Logon
    Each user has an account and password;
    Guests and parents have WiFi access as well.
    BYOT
    Staff, students and community can bring their own technology to school.
    CloudApps
    GoogleApps for Education for email, calendaring, document storage (e.g. Drive), collaboration and more.
    Virtualized Servers
    Virtualized servers for easy backup with business continuity and off-site disaster recovery backup.
    Account Management
    Account management and systems integration is synchronized across multiple systems based on data from the Student Information System.
    Multi-Year Upgrade Plan
    A multi-year upgrade plan is in place for key areas of need such as 1) Computer labs (mobile or desktop), 2) Staff productivity; 3) Network Infrastructure; 4)
    Total Score


    Teaching and Learning


    Key Element
    Ideal
    Score
    (0=No, 1=Yes)
    Clear vision
    Clearly articulated vision of what appropriate technology looks like at every grade level and/or content area.
    Digital Citizenship
    Digital Citizenship lessons are available for both staff and students. Confirmation of lessons for students is included.
    Technology Competency Plan
    A technology competency certification plan (TCCP) with differentiated learning paths for all job classifications has been articulated and is in place.
    Blended Learning
    Students have access to blended learning opportunities via online learning/course management systems, flipped classroom approaches.
    Problem/Project-based Learning (PBL)
    School uses problem or project-based learning to engage students in real life use of technology that enhances learning in core content areas.
    Replace, Not Integrate
    Technology-enhanced learning strategies have replaced paper-n-pencil pedagogical strategies.
    Student learning
    Students help define the tasks, process, solution and collaboration extends beyond the classroom
    Higher-Order Thinking
    Students learn and question at synthesis/evaluation/creation levels.
    Learning Experience
    The learning experience is directly relevant to students and involves creating a product that has a purpose beyond the classroom that directly impacts the students
    Technology
    Technology use is directly connected and needed for task completion and students determine which app(s) would best address their needs
    Total Score


    Administrative, Instructional and Technical Support


    Key Element
    Ideal
    Score
    (0=No, 1=Yes)
    Adequate Staffing
    Adequate technical support proportional to District needs is in place.
    Campus Technology History At-A-Glance
    A history of all purchases, campus improvement plan strategies that include technology are easily accessible in one location.
    Campus Network Maps
    Maps of all campus locations with network drops and wireless access points are available centrally, along with MDF/IDF closet locations.
    Curriculum Handbook
    Curriculum handbook blends technology activities at a high level in all content areas, and is supported by curriculum specialists.
    Data Warehouse
    Data warehouse with support from a database programmer/analyst is available to generate reports from local copies of Student Information System (SIS) data.
    Electronic Inventory
    An electronic inventory system of all technologies is kept and is easily accessible online by stakeholders.
    Video Streaming Solution
    Enables sharing of instructional videos–district staff created–for use by staff, students and community.
    Video Surveillance Server
    Video surveillance servers are sufficient to house video surveillance camera recordings for 2 weeks to 1 month at a time.
    Total Score



    References
    Dr. Chris Moersch’s HEAT

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    YES, THAT!

    Dr. Scott Mcleod (Dangerously Irrelevant) wrote the following in May, 2007…do you think the situation has improved?

    This tale’s been told before. Technology coordinators who are more concerned with disabling than enabling. Technology personnel that we would hope would be progressive, forward thinkers regarding digital technologies but instead are regressive gatekeepers. Teachers and administrators that try to move into the 21st century but run into the brick wall of supervisors or support personnel. 

    Superintendents that allow such situations to occur rather than insisting that their district figure out how to make it work (like other districts have). Educators that fail to understand that the world around them has changed and that their relevance to that world is diminishing daily.

    The answer is a resounding YES, ABSOLUTELY! You’d hope for changes since 2007, right? For fun, I asked a colleague–Mary Ray (@mray29)– to brainstorm a list of NOs that have been converted into YESs:

    1. YES to GoogleApps for Education
    2. YES to encouraging students to bring their own technology to school
    3. YES to encouraging teachers to bring their own technology to school
    4. YES to allowing teachers to be administrators of district-owned technology assigned to them
    5. YES to Campus Facebook, Instagram accounts
    6. YES to Twitter for Professional Learning for Staff
    7. YES to streaming video vs “download it at home and then bring it to work”
    8. YES to creating virtual classroom spaces using Edmodo, Moodle, etc.
    9. YES to YouTube
    10. YES to Blogging as a tool for reflection and publication for students and staff
    11. YES to more bandwidth for schools
    12. YES to ubiquitous WiFi access
    13. YES to Face to Face AND online professional learning opportunities
    14. YES to District-hosted video streaming solution (e.g. PHPMotion)
    15. YES to using social media for instructional support during the day
    One of the questions that came to mind after compiling this list was, what are we not allowing now but wish we could?
    What I’m hoping to eliminate are those speed bumps and roadblocks. Some of the items my colleague came up with (single-handedly, I must say!) included:
    • Personal vs professional pages…not sure if we want more separation or an improvement in professionalism on personal pages. I’m for the latter, myself.
    • YouTube access for students
    • Ample professional learning connected to district expectations and incentives
    • Eliminate old expectations about tech in instructional and leadership settings.
    I’m not sure these address what I was hoping for, so I’m throwing this out to you, faithful reader. What NOs in YOUR schools/districts would you like to see become “YES, THAT!” responses?

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    Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin’s blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

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